8 FORMS OF POVERTY

Working with the Treasures, we’ve seen, felt, even tasted poverty first-hand. We’ve walked alongside children as they’ve grown into adults. We’ve watched many escape poverty. And we’ve watched many stay stuck. What we’ve found is this isn’t just an issue of economic poverty. From spiritual to mental to physical, we’ve identified eight forms of poverty that reinforce each other.

SPIRITUAL POVERTY

Most poor people don’t have a personal relationship with God or knowledge that they are indeed wonderfully made.

INTELLECTUAL POVERTY

The majority have no access to knowledge or technology. They believe they are trash— worthless and dumb.

POVERTY OF AFFECTION

For many, violence is simply a way of life. They live outside of love— in hate, bitterness, low self-esteem and selfishness.

POVERTY OF THE WILL

Too many are enslaved to substance or sex abuse. They lack the will or the encouragement to change.

Watch how the 8 forms of poverty affect the communities and the people we serve.

PHYSICAL POVERTY

Malnutrition, harsh working and living conditions and no access to health care is normal.

POVERTY OF A SUPPORT NETWORK

For many “I am alone” is a very common phrase. People feel a sense of loneliness not just within their often broken families but in the broader community.

POVERTY OF CIVIC INVOLVEMENT

Leadership, cooperation, and collaboration in a community are simply not part of the culture.

ECONOMIC POVERTY

The poor have close to nothing and get by on just $60 a month.

CREATING LASTING CHANGE

Unlike organizations that simply address economic or physical poverty, Potter’s House seeks to deliver five holistic development programs through our community centers: Family Development, Education, Health and Nutrition, Micro-Enterprise and Community Development. From physical to spiritual to mental transformation, we want to empower the poor across Guatemala to make significant changes in their own lives and their communities.

“I have big dreams after college. My biggest dream is to be a Motivational Speaker. I want to share my story because I know that through my story, many young people will be able to change their mindset and be able to dream big. Like me.”

In 2015 at the age of 11 Marcelino weighed 67 lbs. and his height was of 4’3”. “I like the food that we are given at Potter’s House. At home, we usually just eat beans, and most of the time our dinners consist of coffee and bread.” At the end of 2015 Marcelino reached an ideal weight of 72 lbs. and height of 4’4″.

“I thought that I deserved to live in poverty, that I was never going to break this cycle. However throughout the past few years, my mentality changed. Now my biggest wish is to help children overcome that mentality as well. This is the reason I decided to become a teacher, not only to teach math or science, but lessons of life.”